Planned obsolescence: what it is and how to protect yourself

rifiuti, Close-up Engineering
hi-tech leonardo.it
tempo, Close-up Engineering
ilcambiamento.it

The term planned obsolescence refers to the process by which, in modern industrial societies, are raised in the consumer needs of the accelerated replacement of goods or technology from other types. This process is triggered by the production of goods subject to a rapid decay of its own capabilities, and is realized by means of suitable measures introduced during the production phase (use of poor quality materials, planning of repair costs higher than those of purchase, etc.. ), and by disseminating and publicizing of new models which are irrelevant changes in functional terms, but on substantive and formal. The known methods with which the process is triggered concern the use of components that are easily perishable or sometimes the use of electronic systems created ad hoc. In practice, the products fail after the expiration of any warranty period and are usually made so that the repair costs are higher than the purchase of a new model. These design features and manufacturing are also supported by publicity campaigns to propose and develop new models, not necessarily the best, but simply more modern, with a view of entice the consumer to replace the old product with a new one. If the only trick to make a product obsolete before their time is taken from the advertising then we can talk about perceived obsolescence or symbolic.

 

 

ecologia
unicouniverso.altervista.org

However build objects so that they break after a time determined by the manufacturer may be a criminal offense. In France, the debate turns on again after the approval of an amendment of three parliamentary ecologists. As has happened in the past, but maybe the law will never see the light because of the opposition of industrialists. It will be very difficult for the amendment approved in late September by the Special Committee on Energy Assemblée Nationale resist examination of the classroom. The passage of the measure will be long and arduous, and the amendment is likely to have a short life, but it’s still a very strong signal sent to the industrial sector. The planned obsolescence would thus seem to be even a crime punishable by up to two years in prison, as well as a fine of up to 300 thousand euro. That is, anyone who produces objects in order to make them last a little you would be responsible for fraud against consumers, say MPs Eric Alauzet, Denis Baupin and Cécile Duflot. The concept is that there się realized they can not afford the planned obsolescence, for reasons of economic and environmental sustainability.

 

 

Few, however, almost no one probably knows the true story of planned obsolescence and know that its implementation is almost a century precise production strategy that is reflected in the meticulous work of crowds of engineers and researchers, but also documents, records and relations of signs specially organized to mark the times of rotation of products placed on the market. It was about  this made a documentary film titled Spanish Cosima Dannoritzer Comprar, pull, buy – La historia de la secret obsolescencia programada. The film opens with a scene of a boy, Marcos, struggling with a printer that mysteriously suddenly stops working; three different assistances advise him to buy a new device, since its cost would be far lower than the repair. A search on the net reveals, however, the first little secrets that have made prematurely obsolete machine: a particular chip it reads the number of steps and head after a predetermined quantity of prints it freezes. During the documentary, between a movie and the other, the author keeps us updated on the story of Marcos until the final scene: the boy a simple free software download from a Russian website that resets the counter and wake up the printer. A search on the net reveals, however, the first little secrets that have made obsolete machine: a particular chip it reads the number of steps and head after a predetermined quantity of prints it freezes. During the documentary, between a movie and the other, the author keeps us updated on the story of Marcos until the final scene: the boy a simple free software download from a Russian website that resets the counter and wake up the printer. The image perhaps most emblematic of this case history is the one that shows the page of a technical manual Marcos, sifting through the internet, you could find, which is clearly shown that the machine is designed to print eighteen pages and once sold out this amount is to be blocked. Dannoritzer traces the history of planned obsolescence, explaining how and why at some point it was decided to shorten the scientific life cycle of many objects. One of the most striking cases is that of the classic incandescent bulb. It was a success when, in the early years of the century were made of light bulbs can operate for a thousand hours.

 Imagine credits header: hi-tech leonardo.it
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Francesca Granatiero nasce a San Giovanni Rotondo, classe 1988. Frequenta il Liceo Scientifico a Manfredonia per poi intraprendere, conseguito il diploma, la facoltà di Ingegneria Gestionale presso il Politecnico di Bari. Iscrittasi al corso di Laurea Magistrale in Ingegneria Gestionale presso lo stesso Politecnico di Bari consegue il titolo di Esperto in sistemi (SGA) per la gestione delle PMI. Diventa referente e scrittrice per la rivista Close-up Engineering nel settembre 2014 ad oggi. Consegue la laurea in Ingegneria Gestionale Magistrale nel dicembre 2015. Pur avendo un’impronta scientifica e assorta nell’ affascinante mondo dell’ingegneria, è molto appassionata di letteratura classica. D’indole “sognatrice” nel tempo libero ama leggere e viaggiare.